Share with an external audience

Openness is a growing movement in Higher Education typified by the development and sharing online of resources used in teaching and learning and the offering of free on-line courses.

Shared resources and courses enhance the profile of the institution in the disciplines involved and  evidence the quality of teaching offered in its programmes.

The University is developing different platforms for sharing with an external audience, including FutureLearn, YouTube, ITunes U, Jorum and VideoLeeds. Colleagues are encouraged to consider publication of teaching materials on some or all of these platforms.

The sharing of teaching resources with an external audience which may be learners or other educators is now commonly referred to as the offering of Open Educational Resources (OERs).  OERs are materials developed to support teaching and learning which are commonly shared under licences which allow reuse and also often repurposing. These resources can be of any form, for example a video file, an audio file, a word document, a PowerPoint file or even a whole website.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are scheduled courses offered for free often using a dedicated delivery platform (e.g. FutureLearn, Coursera and Udacity). These courses can be on any topic and typically involve large numbers of students who support each others learning through discussion forums and peer assessment.

There are many benefits of creating and sharing OERs and offering a MOOC:

To learners:

  • Free access to materials for self-directed learning that can be discovered and used at the point of need (OERs).
  • Flexible and free access to courses provided by high quality HEIs and opportunities to network with other participating students during the course (MOOCs).

To other educators:

  • No need to reinvent the wheel, existing resources can be discovered, repurposed and used in their teaching (OERs).
  • Use of an open course to fulfil curriculum requirements where local subject matter expertise is limited (MOOCs).

To the developer of the OERs and provider of the MOOC:

  • Sharing high quality teaching resources and experiences will enhance the reputation and profile of the educators involved.

To the providing institution:

  • Shared resources and courses will enhance the profile of the institution in the disciplines involved and will evidence the quality of teaching offered in its programmes, leading to improved recruitment of students and staff.
  • Existing students can benefit from access to additional interactive resources, to give a deeper understanding of their own subject as well as encouraging them to broaden their education beyond their main subject area.

The University of Leeds encourages use and publication of OERs as part of its Digital Strategy for Taught Student Education.  It has released Guidance on Open Educational Resources  by staff and students as an OER. This guidance recognises that the free and open sharing of such resources to other educators and to the general public, is a public good that also raises the profile of the university and highlights the quality of its teaching.

Examples

Share a teaching resource

Share a teaching resource

How – upload the related file (e.g. a Powerpoint file) to Jorum or VideoLeeds and/or share it via a personal blog or website. You can view the online tutorial on how to publish material to VideoLeeds or view the tutorial on how to share your multimedia content via Mediasite.

Why – to help learners understand the topic and offer a resource for other educators to use in their teaching.

Case study – The Human energy metabolism eBook is an e-learning resource created by Dr Sue Whittle and Hayley Atkinson for first year medical students studying nutrition. The resource published version and source files are offered on Jorum to allow other educators to use and adapt these materials.

Consider:

  • See Guidance notes – Creating Digital Content
  • Ensure that the content and use of the resource is described using appropriate keywords so it can be easily discovered by potential users.
  • Check that there are no copyright issues involved in the materials that you share (e.g. check the copyright status of the images used in the resource)
  • Use an appropriate creative commons licence when sharing resources so educators are clear on how these can be used in the future.

Create a online course in iTunesU

Create a online course in iTunesU

How – deliver a short online course using iTunes U. Contact the Digital Learning Team for more information.

Why – make one resource for use both by your students and external learners interested in this topic and promote related courses at the University of Leeds.

Consider:

  • See Guidance notes – Creating Digital Content
  • structuring your course for delivery to a range of abilities
  • learning activities that encourage engagement and peer to peer support in the course forum
  • how to automate feedback to large numbers of participants (quizzes, peer assessment etc)
  • Check that there are no copyright issues involved in the materials that you share (e.g. check the copyright status of the images used in the resource)

Publish a recording to an external audience

Publish a recording to an external audience

How – use MyMediaSite to record a video and share this recording via iTunes U and/or Youtube. You can also publish your recording for individuals to view by sending them the specific URL. You will need to change the security settings in MediaSite to facilitate this. If you change the security settings to “Everyone” then you can advertise the public URL for external access. You can find how to do this by visiting How to Share Content Outside of the VLE.

Why – create a reusable resource that can be used in different teaching contexts and offer this to learners and other educators.

Case study – Dr James Harris provides a four part audio recording of an interview with a leading historian Prof. Sheila Fitzpatrick via iTunes U.

Consider:

Offer a podcast

Offer a podcast

How – make a series of recordings or episodes and offer these on the iTunes U platform

Why – the collection of recordings provide a short self directed course that can be used for anytime, anywhere learning on a variety of devices.

Case study – James Pickering developed a series of ten short screencasts describing various complex structures of human anatomy. These are offered as the Access Anatomy podcast on iTunes U.

Create a MOOC

Create a MOOC

How – deliver a MOOC using the FutureLearn platform. Contact the Digital Learning Team at Leeds.

Why – encourage interest your subject, connect with learners interested in this topic and promote related courses at the University of Leeds.

Case study – Jonathan Pitches offers a 3 week MOOC on the Future Learn platform on An introduction to physical actor training. You can also view a MOOC on World War 1: Changing Faces of Heroism delivered by the University of Leeds in association with the BBC.

Consider:

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